First Nations Governance Forum

The Australian National University
July 2 - 4 2018

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The story so far

Program

  • 02 July
  • 03 July
  • 04 July

Mattias Ahren

Professor of Law
Arctic University of Norway
Mattias Åhrén (PhD) is a Professor of Law at The Arctic University of Norway (UiT) and is currently lecturing on indigenous rights internationally. Åhrén has written extensively on indigenous peoples’ rights under international law, including the book 'Indigenous Peoples’ Status in the International Legal System' (Oxford University Press, 2016). He has also participated in various UN forums on indigenous peoples’ rights, including the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing, and on the 'Outcome Document' of the World Conference on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Mattias belongs to Ohredahke Sami reindeer herding community in northern Sweden.

04 July

04 July

Lars-Anders Baer

Former President
Sámi Parliament, Sweden
Lars-Anders Baer is the former President /Chairman of the Sámi Parliament in Sweden and former President of Sámi Parliamentary Council. He has studied law at the Uppsala and he and his family are also involved in traditional reindeer herding. He has been the President the Sámi Parliamentary Council, which is the highest body in co-operation between the Sámi Parliaments in Finland, Norway and Sweden.

In the early 1970’s, Lars-Anders became the Chairman of the Sámi youth organisation known as Sáminuorra and also involved in organising the pan-Sámi youth movement. In the mid 1970’s he became involved the Nordic Sámi Council and was the Chairman and Vice-Chairman of the organisation several times from the early 1980’s through to the 2000’s.

Lars-Anders was involved in establishing the framework of the Sámi Council and became involved in international indigenous movements. He took part in the second UN conference against racism and apartheid in Geneva in 1983 as a member in the Swedish delegation. In the mid 1980’s, he became Vice-President of the World Council of Indigenous peoples. He has been heavily involved in the UN working group of indigenous populations since the 1983 onwards.

Between 2001 and 2009 he was acting at the President/Chairman of the Sámi Parliament in Sweden. On the national level he has participated in several governmental commissions, in particular the commission that suggested that ILO Convention no. 169 should be ratified by Sweden in 1998. He has also served as an expert and Sámi representative in Swedish official delegations in different UN, European Union and other regional and international events.

Lars-Anders has been involved in indigenous related matters in WIPO, UNESCO and other UN agencies. He has in this capacity published several articles about indigenous rights in newspapers, magazines and books. He has served as member in the board of the UN Voluntary Fund of indigenous peoples between 2003-2007. He is also a former member on UN Permanent Forum of indigenous issues (2008-2010). He has in his personal capacity assisted EU’s agencies and the OECD in matters related indigenous human rights and economic development.

Lars-Anders is currently the Chairman of the Luokta Mavas village in his local community as well as working as an independent consultant. He assists Sámi local communities and villages, indigenous NGO’s as part of the Sámi Council and also the Sámi Parliament in Sweden with various national, regional and global issues.

03 July

Maria Bargh

Victoria University of Wellington
Head of School, Māori Studies
Dr Maria Bargh is Head of School (Tumuaki) and Senior Lecturer at the School of Māori Studies (Te Kawa a Māui). Maria is an ANU alumni, graduating from her PhD in Political Science and International Relations in 2003. Maria researches and teaches in in the areas of Māori politics, including constitutional change and Māori representation, voting in local and general elections, and resource management and the Māori economy. Maria is active in providing commentaries to the media and community groups about Māori politics and issues around Māori rights.

03 July

Else Grete Broderstad

Professor, Centre for Sámi Studies at Arctic University of Norway
Arctic University of Norway
Else Grete Broderstad is a Professor in Indigenous Studies and the Academic Coordinator for the Master’s Program in Indigenous Studies at University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway. Broderstad was a member of the first governmental committee on the High North and a member of the Sámi Rights Commission (2000-2007). Her research interests are within the areas of governance, indigenous rights and political participation combined with deliberative democracy. Broderstad also has an interest in the significance of political procedures and the relationship between indigenous minorities and majorities. She was one of leaders for the community interviews in the cross-disciplinary project TUNDRA. Recently she has produced a scientific paper on the resilience of small-scale fisheries, and written about the problems of reaching an agreement on the cross border reindeer husbandry management between Norway and Sweden. She is currently leading the research project, 'The Arctic governance triangle: governments, Indigenous peoples and industry in change.'

03 July

Ken Coates

Canada Research Chair, Johnson-Shoyama GraduateSchool of Public Policy
University of Saskatchewan
Ken Coates is MLI's Senior Fellow in Aboriginal and Northern Canadian Issues. He is the Canada Research Chair in Regional Innovation in the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of Saskatchewan. He has served at universities across Canada and at the University of Waikato (New Zealand), an institution known internationally for its work on Indigenous affairs. Ken has also worked as a consultant for Indigenous groups and governments in Canada, New Zealand, and Australia as well as for the United Nations, companies, and think tanks. He recently finalised a book called 'Treaty Peoples: Finding Common Ground with Aboriginal Canadians'. He has previously published on such topics as Arctic sovereignty, Aboriginal rights in the Maritimes, northern treaty and land claims processes, regional economic development, and government strategies for working with Indigenous peoples in Canada. His book, 'A Global History of Indigenous Peoples; Struggle and Survival', offered a world history perspective on the issues facing Indigenous communities and governments. He was co-author of the Donner Prize winner for the best book on public policy in Canada, 'Arctic Front: Defending Canada in the Far North', and was short-listed for the same award for his earlier work, 'The Marshall Decision and Aboriginal Rights in the Maritimes'.

04 July

04 July

Stephen Cornell

Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Emeritus Director, Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, and Faculty Chair, Native Nations Institute
University of Arizona
Stephen Cornell is Faculty Chair of the Native Nations Institute at the University of Arizona where he also is Emeritus Professor of Sociology, Emeritus Director of the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, and affiliate faculty in the College of Law. After receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1980, Professor Cornell joined the sociology faculty at Harvard University where he taught for nine years before moving to the University of California, San Diego, for nine more and then joining the Arizona faculty in 1998. While at Harvard, he co-founded, with economist Joseph P. Kalt, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development; at Arizona, he led the establishment of the Native Nations Institute, a partner program to the Harvard Project. He has spent much of the last thirty years working with Indigenous nations and organisations in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Aotearoa New Zealand on governance, development, and related issues.

04 July

04 July

Brian Crane

Queen's Council, Fellow for the Gowling WLG American College of Trial Lawyers
Gowling WLG
Brian A. Crane, Q.C., Partner, Gowling WLG (Canada) LLP, Ottawa, ON. Mr. Crane practises in the areas of constitutional, administrative and aboriginal law. He has appeared as counsel before the Supreme Court of Canada, the Federal Court and the Ontario Courts. He has worked extensively throughout Canada in the negotiation of native land claims and related litigation, and commercial arbitration and mediation. Mr. Crane (with co-authors Robert Mainville and the late Martin Mason) is author of 'First Nations Governance Law' (2nd Edition) LexisNexis Canada, (2008).

03 July

Fernand de Varennes

Special Rapporteur on Minority Issues
United Nations
Dr Fernand de Varennes is the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Minority Issues. He is Dean of the Faculty of Law at the Université de Moncton (Canada) and Extraordinary Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Pretoria (South Africa). In 2019 Dr de Varennes will be the Cheng Yu Tung Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Hong Kong (China). Renowned as one of the world’s leading experts on the international human rights of minorities, he was the founding Editor-in-Chief of the Asia-Pacific Journal on Human Rights and the Law and has worked and written extensively in areas such as the prevention of ethnic conflicts, the rights of migrants and indigenous peoples. He completed his law degrees in Canada (LLB, Moncton), the United Kingdom (LLM, London School of Economics and Political Science), and the Netherlands (Dr Juris, Maastricht). Dr de Varennes’ research and publications record spans some 200 publications in more than 30 languages and is the co-editor for the upcoming Routledge Handbook of Human Rights in Asia. In recognition of his work and achievements, he has received accolades such as the 2004 Linguapax Award (Barcelona, Spain), the Knight’s Cross of the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland, and the Tip O’Neill Peace Fellowship (Northern Ireland, UK).

03 July

TH

Terri Henry

Secretary of State for Eastern Bank of Cherokee Indians
UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues
In June 2016, Ms. Henry was appointed to serve as the expert for North America to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues for a term of three years beginning January 1, 2017. The Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues is an advisory body to the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) that provides expert advice and information on indigenous issues concerning economic and social development, human rights, culture, the environment, education and health. Ms. Henry served as one of the four ViceChairs of the Forum from May 2017 to April 2018. Ms. Henry recently served as the Secretary of State for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Terri is well known for championing sovereignty issues on behalf of her nation, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and all Indian nations at the national level. She provided national leadership on the passage of historic United States laws strengthening the sovereignty and self-governance of Indian nations. These legal reforms included increasing the sentencing authority of Indian tribal courts and the authority of tribal courts to prosecute non-Indians committing acts of domestic violence on Indian lands, and numerous tribal reforms under the Violence Against Women Act. These reforms required organizing Indian nations and tribal grassroots organizations across the United States and allies. In order to achieve these goals, Ms. Henry founded an essential organization, the National Congress of American Indians Task Force on Violence Against Women, which she currently co-chairs. She is a founding member and first Board Chairperson of the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center and currently serves as the Board Chair of the Indian Law Resource Center.

04 July

04 July

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Moana Jackson

New Zealand Lawyer, former Director of the Māori Law Commission and former Judge on International Peoples Tribunal
Moana’s tribal affiliations are Ngāti Kahungunu, Rongomaiwahine and Ngāti Porou from the east coast of Aotearoa/New Zealand. Moana is highly regarded throughout Māoridom and mainstream Aotearoa for his measured and important contribution in the struggles of the Māori people in terms of Te Tiriti o Waitangi (The Treaty of Waitangi) 1840, sovereignty issues and Indigenous rights. He is known and respected at all levels of society - from government level, to academia, through to local marae community level. Moana is seen by his people as a strong advocate for the downtrodden. In 2007, he played a major advocacy role on behalf of members of the rural Māori community of Ruātoki, after NZ Police raided the community based on alleged ‘terrorist’ activity in the community. Moana has recently co-chaired a major Working Group on Constitutional Transformation that was charged with developing a new constitution for Aotearoa based on the Treaty of Waitangi. He has also had extensive involvement in health issues in Aotearoa and overseas ensuring proper and appropriate health care and management for Indigenous peoples. This has included work with the Māori Runanga of the New Zealand Nurses’ Organisation, with Iwi health providers, and participation in several international conferences such as the gathering of the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA). He is a much loved Dad and Koro to his beloved whānau and mokopuna.

04 July

04 July

Miriam Jorgensen

Research Director for Native Nations Institute
University of Arizona and Harvard
Miriam Jorgensen is a Research Director of the University of Arizona Native Nations Institute, a Research Director of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development, and Professor of Indigenous Nation Building at the University of Technology Sydney Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research. Her work in Indigenous governance and economic development—in the United States, Canada, and Australia—has addressed issues as wide-ranging as child welfare policy, policing and justice systems, natural-resource management, cultural stewardship, land ownership, tribal enterprises, housing, financial education, and philanthropy. She is a co-author of Structuring Sovereignty: Constitutions of Native Nations (UCLA AIS Press 2014); editor and co-author of Indigenous Justice: New Tools, Approaches and Spaces (Palgrave Macmillan 2018) and of Rebuilding Native Nations: Strategies for Governance and Development (University of Arizona Press 2007); lead author of the U.S. Treasury Department’s two-part Access to Credit and Capital in Native Communities report (2016, 2017); and USA senior editor of the International Indigenous Policy Journal. Jorgensen co-founded the Indigenous Governance degree and continuing education programs at the University of Arizona. She has been a Visiting Scholar in law and social work at Washington University in St. Louis; a Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the University of Technology Sydney; and Professorial Research Fellow at the Melbourne School of Government. She received her BA in economics from Swarthmore College, MA in human sciences from the University of Oxford, and both an MPP in international development and PhD in political economics from Harvard University

04 July

04 July

Jefferson Keel

President
National Congress of American Indians
Jefferson Keel serves as the 22nd President of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), the oldest, largest and most representative American Indian and Alaska Native tribal government organization in the country. President Keel was elected on October 2017 at NCAI’s 74th Annual Convention to serve a third nonconsecutive term as President of NCAI.

As a proud Native American, President Keel is firmly committed to the service of Indian Country. Serving his fifth term as the Lt. Governor of the Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma he is keenly aware of the roles and responsibilities expected of tribal leaders and earnestly believes in the policy of “helping our people through honorable public service.”

President Keel also represents Indian Country on numerous national boards and committees including serving on the Board of Advisors for the Center for Native American Youth, created by former Senator Dorgan at the Aspen Institute. In addition, he was appointed as one of nine commissioners to serve on Tribal Law and Order Commission established under the Tribal Law and Order Act in 2010.

President Keel has previously served as Chair of the Tribal Interior Budget Committee, on the Indian Health Service Policy Advisory Committee, the Centers for Disease Control Tribal Consultation Advisory Committee, the Self-Governance Advisory Committee, the Department of Health and Human Services Secretary’s Tribal Advisory Committee, the Health Research Advisory Council for the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Minority Health, and the Department of Justice Tribal Advisory Group.

President Keel is a retired U.S. Army officer with over 20 years active duty service. He served three years of service in Vietnam, and received numerous awards and decorations for heroism, including two Purple Hearts and the Bronze Star with "V" for valor. He is a former Airborne Ranger, infantry platoon sergeant, platoon leader, and served as an instructor in the elite U.S. Army Rangers.

President Keel earned his Bachelor’s degree from East Central University and Master’s degree from Troy State University. He is a Master Mason and a member of the East Central University Board of Directors. He is active in his church and community. President Keel and his wife, Carol, have three children and eight grandchildren.

03 July

Dalee Sambo Dorough

Associate Professor
University of Alaska Anchorage
Dalee Sambo Dorough (Inuit-Alaska) is an Associate Professor at UAA. Engaged for over 34 years at the UN, ILO, OAS and other international fora, she is a former Expert Member and Chairperson of the UNPFII and specializes in international human rights law as well as political and legal relations between States and Indigenous peoples. She holds a PhD from University of British Columbia, Faculty of Law (2002) and a Master of Arts in Law & Diplomacy from The Fletcher School at Tufts University (1991). Current areas of research include Indigenous human rights, Arctic policy and Arctic related issues. She is also co-Chair of the International Law Association Committee on Implementation of Indigenous Rights. Her recent publications include “The Rights, Interests and Role of the Arctic Council Permanent Participants”, R. Beckman, T. Henriksen, K. Kraabel, E.J. Molenaar and J.A. Roach (eds) "Governance of Arctic Shipping. Balancing Rights and Interests of Arctic States and User States" (Netherlands: Brill Publishing, 2017) and E/C.19/2016/4 "Study on how States exploit weak procedural rules in international organizations to devalue the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and other international human rights law", with Chief Edward John, May 9, 2016, at https://www.un.org/development/desa/indigenouspeoples/unpfii-sessions-2/unpfii-fifteenth-session.html

03 July

Linda Smith

Professor, Māori and Indigenous Studies
Waikato University
Linda Tuhiwai Smith PhD., FRSNZ. CNZM is Professor of Māori and Indigenous Studies at the University of Waikato, New Zealand. She has a PhD from the University of Auckland. Professor Smith is a member of the Waitangi Tribunal and the Māori Economic Development Advisory Board. She has served on the Boards of the Health Research Council, the Marsden Fund and the Royal Society of New Zealand. She was also a member of the Constitutional Advisory Panel. Professor Smith comes from two Iwi, Ngāti Porou and Ngāti Awa. She was a member of the negotiation group for the Treaty Settlement for Ngāti Porou. Professor Smith has a NZ Honour as Companion to the NZ Order of Merit. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand and has an Honorary Doctor of Laws from the University of Winnepeg, Canada.

04 July

04 July

Victoria Tauli-Corpuz

UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
UN Philippines
Victoria is an indigenous leader from the Kankanaey Igorot people of the Cordillera Region in the Philippines. She is a social development consultant, indigenous activist, civic leader, human rights expert, public servant, and an advocate of women's rights in the Philippines. She was the former Chair of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (2005‐2010). As an indigenous leader she got actively engaged in drafting and adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007. She helped build the indigenous peoples' movement in the Cordillera as a youth activist in the early 1970s. She helped organize indigenous peoples in the community level to fight against the projects of the Marcos Dictatorship such as the Chico River Hydroelectric Dam and the Cellophil Resources Corporation. These communities succeeded in stopping these. She is the founder and executive director of Tebtebba Foundation (Indigenous Peoples' International Center for Policy Research and Education). Ms. Tauli‐Corpuz has founded and managed various NGOs involved in social awareness raising, climate change, the advancement of indigenous peoples' and women's rights. A member of the Kankana‐ey Igorot peoples, she was the chairperson of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. She is an Expert for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and has served as the chairperson‐ rapporteur of the Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Populations. She is also the indigenous and gender adviser of the Third World Network and a member of United Nations Development Programme Civil Society Organizations Advisory Committee.

03 July

Tariana Turia

Former member of Parliament
New Zealand Parliament
Hon. Dame Tariana Turia is the Founding Member of the Maori Party. During her time as an MP for NZ Parliament, Dame Tariana was Minister for Whānau Ora, Disability Issues, Community and Voluntary Sector. Dame Tariana has also held the following portfolios as: Associate Minister of Health, Maori Affairs, Child, Youth and Family, Social Development, Tertiary Education, Skills, Employment, Corrections; Deputy Chair of the Ministerial Committee on Poverty; Chair of the Ministerial Committee on Family Violence.

03 July

Grand Chief Patrick Wedaseh Madahbee

Grand Council Chief
Anishinabek Nation Inc
Grand Council Chief Patrick Wedaseh Madahbee is currently serving his third consecutive term as Grand Council Chief of the Anishinabek Nation. He also served one term as Grand Council Chief in 1980, the youngest Grand Council Chief ever at 27 years of age. He is also the President of the Union of Ontario Indians and the Anishinabek Nation 7th Generation Charity.

He is currently the Health portfolio holder for the Chiefs of Ontario, member of the Assembly of First Nations Chiefs Committee of Health, and Co-chair of the joint Non-insured health benefits review. He also serves as co-chair of the Trilateral First Nations Health Senior Officials Committee (TFNSSOC).

Patrick has more than 40 years’ experience in Band politics, including 17 years as Chief of Aundeck Omni Kaning First Nation. Mr. Madahbee has served as Manager of Aboriginal Financial Services for TD and as a Regional Sales Manager for the First Nations Bank of Canada. His prior roles on a regional level include Lake Huron Regional Grand Chief, Lake Huron representative on the Anishinabek Nation Leadership Council, Ontario Regional Chief, and the Tribal Chair of the United Chiefs and Council of Mnidoo Mnising. His business experience includes President of Castle Building Supply.

His dedication to the Anishinabek Nation has included active leadership positions such as chairperson for the Robinson-Huron Treaty Claim Legal Strategy Team and the Anishinabek/Ontario Fisheries Resource Centre. He is the past Vice President of the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto and has held numerous other board positions.

Grand Council Chief Madahbee has been involved in business development, management, finance, Band management, program supervision, community infrastructure and development, federal and provincial programs and resources, and is an active participant in the political arena with the Anishinabek Nation, Chiefs of Ontario, and the Assembly of First Nations.

04 July

04 July

Lorena Allam

Indigenous affairs editor
The Guardian
Lorena Allam is descended from the Yuwalaraay and Gamilaraay nations of far north west NSW, and grew up on saltwater country on the south coast of NSW. Lorena lives and works on Gadigal land in Sydney and is the Indigenous affairs editor for Guardian Australia. She has worked in the media for 27 as an investigative journalist and editor for the ABC and the BBC. She has presented and produced many ABC Radio National programs including Awaye, Background Briefing and Hindsight. Lorena has also written for a range of history and social justice publications and was the media officer for the Bringing them Home inquiry into the separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families.

Brooke Boney

Triple J Breakfast news presenter
ABC
Brooke is a Gamilaroi Gomeroi woman and is the breakfast news presenter on Triple J radio. She’s been working as a journalist since 2010, has travelled around the world with the Prime Minister, reported on Eurovision, covered two election campaigns and written a lot about what it’s like to be an Aboriginal person in Australia.

03 July

Dan Bourchier

Radio host & News presenter
ABC
Dan Bourchier is a multi-award winning multi-platform journalist with the ABC. He is a broadcaster and hosts a daily breakfast radio program on ABC Radio Canberra, and anchors ABC Canberra’s 7pm news. He has reported across the country and around the world for close to 20 years.

Dan grew up in the remote Northern Territory town of Tennant Creek, where he was mentored by elders from around the region, while coming to understand his own Indigenous heritage from his mum’s side of the family in coastal and inland parts of Victoria.

He was driven to news and reporting from an early age, and began a traineeship at the Tennant and District Times as a teenager still at school. Dan has worked as a newspaper reporter, video journalist, foreign correspondent, political reporter, and social commentator.
The keen runner and reader of biographies was a foundation member of the NT Parliament’s bipartisan advisory committee in to Statehood and has been a keen advocate for democratic equality and equity. He has sat on numerous boards, committees and charities, using his considerable experience in structural reform, governance, and media and communications. He is an in-demand MC, event facilitator, and expert communicator who has worked across the nation.

Dan is driven by giving voice to the voiceless, holding to account those in positions of power, and telling really great stories. While not an expert in governance, Dan has strong views on democratic empowerment, and says the Uluru Statement from the Heart was a crucial process and point of direction – and one that we all need to work towards. He sees the ANU’s First Nations Forum as a crucial next step and he looks forward to facilitating the discussion.

04 July

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Fred Chaney

Former Deputy Leader of the Liberal Party
Fred Chaney was in the Australian Parliament from 1974 to 1993 and led the Coalition parties in the Senate from 1983 to 1990. In 1989-90 he was Deputy Leader of the Liberal Party. He has been involved with Indigenous issues as a university student in the late 1950s and early 60s, as a lawyer to 1974, Senator and MP from 1974 to 1993, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs 1978-80, researcher post politics at UWA, Member and later a Deputy President of the National Native Title Tribunal from 1995 to 2007, Co-Chair Reconciliation Australia 2000 to 2004, Board member from 2000 to 2014, his current board memberships are Central Desert Native Title Services, Reconciliation WA and the Graham (Polly) Farmer Foundation. HIs recent focus has been on the political and administrative failure of governments to live up to their rhetorical promises to work with other than Indigenous people. In all hIs work in Indigenous Affairs he tries to support and be guided by Indigenous aspirations.

03 July

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04 July

Hilary Charlesworth

Melbourne Laureate Professor, Co-Director of Studies, Human Rights Law
The University of Melbourne
Hilary Charlesworth is a Melbourne Laureate Professor at Melbourne Law School. She is also a Distinguished Professor at the Australian National University. Her research includes the structure of the international legal system, peacebuilding, human rights law and international humanitarian law and international legal theory, particularly feminist approaches to international law. Hilary received the American Society of International Law’s award for creative legal scholarship for her book, co-authored with Christine Chinkin, The Boundaries of International Law. She was also awarded, with Christine Chinkin, the American Society of International Law’s Goler T. Butcher award for ‘outstanding contributions to the development or effective realization of international human rights law’. Hilary has held both an Australian Research Council Federation Fellowship (2005-2010) and an ARC Laureate Fellowship (2010-2015). 

03 July

Mick Dodson

Co-Convenor
First Nations Governance Forum
Professor Mick Dodson AM is a member of the Yawuru peoples – the traditional owners of land and waters in the Broome area of the southern Kimberley region of Western Australia. He is the former Director of the National Centre for Indigenous Studies at The Australian National University.

Mick Dodson was Australia's first Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner with the Human Rights Commission.

Born in Katherine in the Northern Territory, Mick was educated in Katherine, Darwin and Victoria. He completed a Bachelor of Jurisprudence and a Bachelor of Laws at Monash University.

Mick was Counsel assisting the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody.
Mick Dodson has been a prominent advocate on land rights and other issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, as well as a vigorous advocate of the rights and interests of indigenous peoples around the world.

In 2009, Mick Dodson was named Australian of the Year by the National Australia Day Council.

Professor Dodson was formerly the Malcolm Fraser & Gough Whitlam Harvard Chair in Australian Studies at Harvard University Cambridge USA.

02 July

Gareth Evans

Chancellor
The Australian National University
Professor the Hon Gareth Evans AC QC FASSA FAIIA has been Chancellor of the Australian National University since January 2010. He was a Cabinet Minister in the Hawke and Keating Labor Governments from 1983-96, in the posts of Attorney General, Minister for Resources and Energy, Minister for Transport and Communications and - from 1988-96 - Foreign Minister. During his 21 years in Australian politics he was Leader of the Government in the Senate (1993-96) and Deputy Leader of the Opposition in the House of Representatives (1996-98).

From 2000 to 2009 he was President and CEO of the Brussels-based International Crisis Group, the independent global conflict prevention and resolution organisation.

02 July

Stan Grant

Chief Asia Correspondent
ABC
Stan Grant is the ABC's Chief Asia Correspondent and host of the flagship current affairs program Matter of Fact from 2018. He is one of Australia's most respected and awarded journalists, with more than 30 years experience in radio and television news and current affairs. Stan has a strong reputation for independence and integrity and has interviewed international political and business leaders, including our own prime ministers and senior ministers. Prior to taking up his latest role Stan served for a decade as a Senior International Correspondent for CNN in Asia and the Middle East, broadcasting to an audience of millions around the world. Stan is an award winning and best selling author of several books and has contributed articles to many major Australian newspapers, magazines and journals

03 July

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Robert Griew

Principal
Nous Group

04 July

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HJ

Harry Jenkins

Daryl Karp

Director
Museum of Australian Democracy
Ms Daryl Karp has worked as a senior executive in the broadcast and cultural industries for over 20 years. As a senior consultant in the creative industries she facilitates industry analysis, leading to growth and innovation, with a unique mix of business expertise, board experience and creative problem solving. Her outcome focused approach draws on extensive experience in strategic planning, stakeholder engagement, marketing and communications and change management.

02 July

Rosemary Laing

Advisory Council
National Archives of Australia
Dr Rosemary Laing was Clerk of the Senate from 2009 to 2017, the first woman appointed to that role, and an officer of the department of the Senate from 1990. Her academic qualifications include a BA(Hons) from the University of Sydney, a DPhil from Oxford University and a Graduate Diploma in Public Law from the Australian National University. She edited the 13th and 14th editions of Odgers' Australian Senate Practice, and was the editor and principal author of the Annotated Standing Orders of the Australian Senate (2009) which explores the derivation of parliamentary procedure and operating rules. She has otherwise written widely on parliamentary law, practice and procedure and on parliamentary history, including the introduction to Volume 4 of the Biographical Dictionary of the Australian Senate (1983–2002). Now retired from full-time employment, she is undertaking private research and was appointed to the National Archives of Australia Advisory Council in September 2017.

Michael Mansell

Chairman and Legal Manager
Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation
Michael Alexander Mansell is a Tasmanian Aboriginal leader, who as an activist and lawyer, has worked for social, political and legal changes to improve the lives and social standing of Tasmanian Aborigines.

03 July

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Carla McGrath

Board Member
GetUp!

04 July

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Bob McMullan

Director, ANU Crawford Leadership Forum
The Australian National University
Bob McMullan has had a long and distinguished career in the Australian Parliament as one of Australia’s pre-eminent Labor politicians. He is a former Parliamentary Secretary for International Development (2007-2010) and Executive Director for the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. He is now the Director of the ANU Crawford Leadership Forum and a Visiting Fellow at the Development Policy Centre.

03 July

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Amelia Noble

03 July

Brian Schmidt

Vice-Chancellor and Co-Convenor, First Nations Governance Forum
The Australian National University
Professor Schmidt is the 12th Vice-Chancellor of The Australian National University (ANU). Winner of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, Professor Schmidt was an astrophysicist at the ANU Mount Stromlo Observatory and Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics before becoming Vice-Chancellor.
Professor Schmidt received undergraduate degrees in Astronomy and Physics from the University of Arizona in 1989, and completed his Astronomy Master's degree (1992) and PhD (1993) from Harvard University. Under his leadership, in 1998, the High-Z Supernova Search team made the startling discovery that the expansion rate of the Universe is accelerating. Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, The United States Academy of Science, and the Royal Society, he was made a Companion of the Order of Australia in 2013.

03 July

04 July

Asmi Wood

Director, National Centre for Indigenous Studies
The Australian National University
Associate Professor Asmi Wood is an Indigenous barrister and constitutional recognition scholar, who teaches at the ANU College of Law. He was made a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy in 2017, was the recipient of the OLT Australian Award for University Teaching: Neville Bonner Award for Indigenous Education in 2015, and also the ANU Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence in 2010.

04 July

04 July

Museum of Australian Democracy

Accor Hotels

First Nations Governance Forum Program

First Nations Forum Program Draft 180618.pdf Download Link

The Forum in context

The story so far.pdf Download Link
Museum of Australian Democracy

Reception and registration

06:00 PM 07:00 PM Members Bar, Museum of Australian Democracy, Old Parliament House

Museum of Australian Democracy

Opening dinner

07:00 PM 08:30 PM Members Dining Room, Muesum of Australian Democracy, Old Parliament House

What place should our First Nations hold in contemporary Australia’s Constitution? Rekindling national discussion about this key question lies at the heart of the First Nations Forum. Professor Mick Dodson will outline Australia’s journey so far, highlighting both how far we have come and how far we still have to go.

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

Welcome ceremony

08:00 AM 08:30 AM Turning circle at rear of Old Parliament House

Traditional custodians of the Canberra region will provide a traditional welcome to the Forum’s delegates on the steps of Old Parliament House.

Speakers

Lewellyn Hall

Live stream from the Muesum of Australian Democracy

08:00 AM 05:15 PM Llewellyn Hall

Livestream from the Muesum of Australian Democracy
Museum of Australian Democracy

Delegate registration

08:30 AM 08:45 AM Foyer, Muesum of Australian Democracy, Old Parliament House

Lewellyn Hall

Welcome from the Forum Host

08:45 AM 09:00 AM Llewellyn Hall

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

How do First Nations people fit into the governance model around the world?

09:00 AM 10:30 AM House of Representatives Chamber, Museum of Australian Democracy, Old Parliament House

Australia is not alone in seeking to define the role of their First Nations in the country’s legal structures. Drawing on their extensive international experience, our speakers will examine how other countries have approached this issue. They will consider lessons that Australia might take to appropriately recognise our First Nations, and how we might gain broad public support for constitutional change. Professor Charlesworth will then contextualise Australia’s constitutional position against the backdrop of international human rights law.

Speakers

Breaks

Break

10:30 AM 11:00 AM Foyer, Muesum of Australian Democracy, Old Parliament House

Museum of Australian Democracy

How do First Nations people in New Zealand and Canada fit into the legal structures and governance of their countries?

11:00 AM 12:30 PM House of Representatives Chamber, Museum of Australian Democracy, Old Parliament House

Legal and political experts from New Zealand and Canada will explain provide a historical context for the contemporary role of their First Nations in their legal and governing structures, and reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of each nation’s approach.

Speakers

Breaks

Lunch

12:30 PM 01:30 PM Members Dining Room, Muesum of Australian Democracy Old Parliament House

Museum of Australian Democracy

How do First Nations people in the United States of America and Scandinavia fit into the legal structures and governance of their countries?

01:30 PM 03:00 PM House of Representatives Chamber, Museum of Australian Democracy, Old Parliament House

Legal and political experts from the USA and Scandinavia will explain provide a historical context for the contemporary role of their First Nations in their legal and governing structures, and reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of each nation’s approach.

Speakers

Breaks

Break

03:00 PM 03:30 PM Foyer, Muesum of Australian Democracy, Old Parliament House

Museum of Australian Democracy

The Australian Context

03:30 PM 04:30 PM House of Representatives Chamber, Museum of Australian Democracy, Old Parliament House

Leaders from Australian business, academia and politics will reflect on the experiences shared by other countries over the course of the day. They will consider how those experiences might inform Australia’s next steps by considering what conditions and action are needed to enable change in Australia.

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

The Future

04:30 PM 04:50 PM House of Representatives Chamber, Museum of Australian Democracy, Old Parliament House

What would a change mean for Australia, and for Indigenous people, particularly the next generation? Young Australians will discuss their aspirations for the future.

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

Reflection

04:50 PM 05:15 PM House of Representatives Chamber, Museum of Australian Democracy, Old Parliament House

What can we learn from other jurisdictions around the world? What should we do for Australia?

Speakers

Breaks

Reception

05:30 PM 07:00 PM Members Dining Room, Muesum of Australian Democracy Old Parliament House

Museum of Australian Democracy

Opening remarks

08:00 AM 08:30 AM Members Dining Room 2

Our host will summarise the previous day’s discussion and provide an outline of today’s proceedings.

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

Workshop Group 1: What are the options for Australia?

08:30 AM 10:00 AM Private Dining Room 1

Delegates will break into groups to further discuss international experience and what this means for Australia, drawing on the experience of international and national discussion leaders. Facilitators will focus group discussion on three main areas raised in the Uluru Statement: Constitutional recognition of First Nations; development of an overarching agreement/Makaratta; and providing an appropriate First Nations voice in Australia’s governance.

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

Workshop Group 2: What are the options for Australia?

08:30 AM 10:10 AM Private Dining Room 2

Delegates will break into groups to further discuss international experience and what this means for Australia, drawing on the experience of international and national discussion leaders. Facilitators will focus group discussion on three main areas raised in the Uluru Statement: Constitutional recognition of First Nations; development of an overarching agreement/Makaratta; and providing an appropriate First Nations voice in Australia’s governance.

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

Workshop Group 3: What are the options for Australia?

08:30 AM 10:00 AM Members Dining Room 1

Delegates will break into groups to further discuss international experience and what this means for Australia, drawing on the experience of international and national discussion leaders. Facilitators will focus group discussion on three main areas raised in the Uluru Statement: Constitutional recognition of First Nations; development of an overarching agreement/Makaratta; and providing an appropriate First Nations voice in Australia’s governance.

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

Workshop Group 4: What are the options for Australia?

08:30 AM 10:00 AM Members Dining Room 3

Delegates will break into groups to further discuss international experience and what this means for Australia, drawing on the experience of international and national discussion leaders. Facilitators will focus group discussion on three main areas raised in the Uluru Statement: Constitutional recognition of First Nations; development of an overarching agreement/Makaratta; and providing an appropriate First Nations voice in Australia’s governance.

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

Break

10:00 AM 10:30 AM Members Dining Foyer

Light refreshments available
Museum of Australian Democracy

Workshop Group 1: What are the next steps for Australia?

10:30 AM 12:00 PM Private Dining Room 1

Delegates will break into groups and discuss the next steps for Australia, drawing on the experience of international and Australian discussion leaders. Facilitators will seek views on what Australia should do to ensure that change has the highest possible chance of being successfully agreed and implemented.

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

Workshop Group 2: What are the next steps for Australia?

10:30 AM 12:00 PM Private Dining Room 2

Delegates will break into groups and discuss the next steps for Australia, drawing on the experience of international and Australian discussion leaders. Facilitators will seek views on what Australia should do to ensure that change has the highest possible chance of being successfully agreed and implemented.

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

Workshop Group 3: What are the next steps for Australia?

10:30 AM 12:00 PM Members Dining Room 1

Delegates will break into groups and discuss the next steps for Australia, drawing on the experience of international and Australian discussion leaders. Facilitators will seek views on what Australia should do to ensure that change has the highest possible chance of being successfully agreed and implemented.

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

Workshop Group 4: What are the next steps for Australia?

10:30 AM 12:00 PM Members Dining Room 3

Delegates will break into groups and discuss the next steps for Australia, drawing on the experience of international and Australian discussion leaders. Facilitators will seek views on what Australia should do to ensure that change has the highest possible chance of being successfully agreed and implemented.

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

Lunch

12:00 PM 01:30 PM Members Dining Room 2

Museum of Australian Democracy

National Press Club broadcast

12:30 PM 01:30 PM Members Dining Room, Muesum of Australian Democracy Old Parliament House

Three speakers from the First Nations Governance Forum will be featured at the National Press Club. The address will be broadcast live for Forum delegates.
Lewellyn Hall

National Press Club broadcast

12:30 PM 01:30 PM Llewellyn Hall

Museum of Australian Democracy

What have we learned and where do we go to from here?

01:45 PM 03:15 PM Members Dining Room 2, Muesum of Australian Democracy Old Parliament House

The panel will summarise the key messages that have emerged from the Forum and discuss the next steps to progress the conversation.

Speakers

Lewellyn Hall

Live stream from the Muesum of Australian Democracy

01:45 PM 04:00 PM Llewellyn Hall

Museum of Australian Democracy

Closing remarks

03:15 PM 03:30 PM Members Dining Room, Muesum of Australian Democracy Old Parliament House

Speakers

Museum of Australian Democracy

Closing reception

04:00 PM 05:00 PM Members Dining Room, Muesum of Australian Democracy Old Parliament House